The POWER of WordPress

See the possibilities

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I saw this article about WordPress today in TechCrunch that boasts some more than impressive numbers. According to WordPress they are powering almost 15% of the top million websites and that 22 out of 100 new websites in the US are powered by WordPress. Wow. WordPress is a blogging platform but it clearly can be used for so much more. We at IT Babble use WordPress.com, but will eventually move it to a private server. When we do that we will have to download the WordPress software at WordPress.org.

So why tell you about this? Well, it just goes to show you the WordPress and other blogging platforms (Blogger and Posterous) can be used for more than just blogging. Check out some ideas below:

  • Digital Portfolios
  • Electronic bulletin board
  • An open forum for debate
  • A space for students to share information and collaborate
  • A place for students to voice their opinion about the course of the class

I’m sure that you the reader can come up with more dynamic ways that you could use a blog and if you need some help setting one up check out our guides.

The school year is still young-set up a blog for your own needs and have some fun. 🙂

Happy blogging everyone.

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About Patrick Cauley

I teach middle school technology and love to play around with tech and teach students and colleagues alike. You can read my blog at www.itbabble.com
This entry was posted in Opinion and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to The POWER of WordPress

  1. Pingback: The POWER of WordPress | Instructional Technology in Middle School | Scoop.it

  2. Alex, thanks for stopping by. The difference is WordPress.com is hosted on WordPress servers. It is free but you have limited control over what you can do. For example if you wanted to change the CSS or load videos onto your site, you will have to pay WordPress.com money for those features.
    Wordpress.org is where you can download the WordPress software. Then pay for some server space anywhere and load it there. Once loaded, you have over 200,000 plug-ins and you have complete control over the appearance and what it can do.
    If you just want to get your feet wet, try a WordPress.com site, then when you’re ready and feel comfortable with the software you can easily transfer it over to the server.
    Here is WordPress.com explaining the differences in this support page: http://en.support.wordpress.com/com-vs-org/
    Best of luck with your commerce business

  3. Alex Ponce says:

    Can anyone explain the difference between wordpress. com and wordpress.org. I have an ecommerce site but I wanted my own blog on wordpress.

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