Tag Archives: Microsoft

Augmented Reality – Don’t be bamboozled!

Hey are you looking to buy bridge? I mean who doesn’t need a bridge? I’ll sell it to you and you can charge a toll for all the cars, bikes and people that will cross it and before you know it, you’ll be swimming in money! So what do you say?

Apple is holding an event next week (September 15, 2020) where they will announce some new iPads and a new Apple Watch and augmented reality (AR) will be a big part of the event. If you’re not familiar augmented reality watch the video below (it’s a little annoying but short).

The Pitch (I mean) Promise

Apple (amongst others) has been trying to push AR onto us as the next big thing for a while. It was first brought up during the release of the iPhone 8 and 10 and while it is pretty neat to see a life size tiger in your living room and to have the ability to view furniture in your home before you purchase it, AR does not solve any problems.

Microsoft, makers of the HoloLens, have changed the focus of their device from an everyday, every person device; to a more industrial vision of a workers consulting with experts back in a home office who can see exactly what the employee sees and can interact through their display by overlaying instructions, schematics and directions onto their real world through AR. They focused the use of their product and found a place where it can be used.

So why bring this up?

These companies keep trying to sell AR as an idea and to show what it can do as opposed to showing what problems it can solve. They do this by having very flashy, professional examples of what it can do and the promise that developers can take it to the next level. They want you to buy and then find a place for it in your school or classroom.

The problem is this doesn’t solve anything. Computers in the classroom solves a problem. It gives students and teachers access to the Internet and tools with which to collaborate, create and organize their classwork, their curriculum and multiple ways to present said curriculum and work.

Projectors and displays in classrooms solve a problem. They allow teachers to present videos, documents and electronic examples of projects to an entire class so everyone can easily view that information. This is technology that solves a problem and has a purpose.

Now ask yourself, what problem does AR solve? What is its purpose?

Don’t worry if you can’t come up with big educational issues that AR addresses. You’re not alone. Check out this article from CNET: Apples AR Plans are becoming more of a reality by Ian Sherr.

Here is a professional tech journalist having difficulties to even guess what “reality” actually means with AR. What is its purpose and how can it fit into the everyday world. It still sounds like a hobby for some developers and not really a serious option for businesses, education or the everyday person.

This sounds familiar?

We heard the same thing with virtual reality. It was going to be the next big tech! It was going to transform how we:

  • Work
  • Shop
  • Collaborate
  • Game
  • Live
  • Etc

It didn’t really shake up the world like people had predicated. Outside of video games (most have not been very impressive) I don’t see people reaching for their VR goggles when something needs to be done.

Now you only see it for video games and simulations. It is a far cry from William Gibson’s Neuromancer novels. The first one is a really good read by the way.

Not useless though

I am not saying that this isn’t cool tech because it is pretty neat and I have seen it in use. Some of the more common examples are in the medical field where doctors can simulate operations or view scans and cross-sections of the body without actually having to physically lay their hands on a cadaver. I have also seen examples in industry. Where a technician could be teleconferencing with an expert back at an office going and working in tandem to solve a problem, install a product or troubleshoot issues.

Why the hate?

It’s not hate, its cautionary. Companies are going to try and sell this to you. When Apple takes the stage next week they want you to buy their products. I guarantee a “revolutionary” feature they are going to talk about is augmented reality. In reality, no one needs this.

If you are a bleeding edge educator and want to dive into the deep end with AR go right ahead. Just make sure that when you are promoted, leave for another job at another school, retire or change departments; that you have left enough documentation, projects, support and ideas for the next person to step in and take it over. If you don’t, it will wither on the vine and that investment right along with it.

Remember that it is just a sales pitched. I encourage you to spend your money elsewhere and continue to watch the space. It may develop into something more. Right now, in its current state, it’s not going to leave a dent in education.

Don’t be suckered.

Episode 158 – Trends? Maybe not

Tony and Patrick are back for another great episode. Check out the talking points below and be sure to subscribe to us on iTunes or your favorite podcasting app.

  1. Apple, Microsoft and Amazon’s events
    1. Apple – https://www.macrumors.com/2018/09/12/everything-apple-announced-2018-iphone-event/
    2. Microsoft – https://www.theverge.com/2018/10/2/17923080/microsoft-event-2018-announcements-news-surface-laptop-windows-10-updates
    3. Amazon – https://www.theverge.com/2018/9/20/17882582/amazon-event-september-2018-echo-alexa-speaker-news
      1. https://aws.amazon.com/deeplens/
    4. https://www.samsung.com/global/galaxy/galaxy-tab-s4/
    5. New Apple Event – October 30th
  2. Chromebook
    1. Project Streaming – https://projectstream.google.com/aco/invite
    2. https://techcrunch.com/2018/10/01/google-gets-into-game-streaming-with-project-stream-and-assassins-creed-odyssey-in-chrome/
  3. Predictions, Patience and Observations by Patrick
    1. https://itbabble.com/2018/09/23/predictions-patience-and-observation/
    2. Beware of predictions and getting “caught up” in the moment.
  4. Tony topic: Scheduling – Don’t be a trendsetter.
    1. Steve Jobs Lost Interview – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBh5_j4a1yo
    2. aSc Timetable: https://www.asctimetables.com/
  5. https://www.pgatour.com/tournaments/the-cj-cup-at-nine-bridges.html

Download this episode here!

Episode 140 – It’s REAL!

Tony and myself are back! It’s been a while since we published a podcast, but this one is worth it! We talk about the Zoom Q8, Microsoft news, Ransomware and Tony’s rant. Check out the talking points below and find us on iTunes, Podomatic or your favorite podcast app.

  1. Zoom Q8
    https://www.zoom-na.com/products/field-video-recording/video-recording/zoom-q8
  2. Microsoft news
    1. Windows 10S
    2. We think the Edge browser stinks
    3. Surface laptop – http://www.techradar.com/reviews/microsoft-surface-laptop
    4. Surface Pro (5) – https://blogs.windows.com/devices/2017/05/23/meetnewsurface-pro/#tuASGQ8wLX6FXZX8.97
  3. Ransomware – It’s real!
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ransomware
  4. Tony’s Rant

You can download the episode HERE!

Office 365 for Education, What You Need to Know and Don’t Want to Hear

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I have been using various versions of Microsoft education solutions since 2007. I am also quiet adept at developing online Sharepoint solutions for business processes, writing custom scripts to make accessing Microsoft resources easier, and by-passing much of the fake resources and security Microsoft has to offer. In addition, I have been using Google Apps since they were first introduced, mostly because I needed to work and the Microsoft made it difficult to do anything aside from typing a memo 1990’s style. My Google experience extends to setting-up Google Apps for education on three occasions, writing custom app functions, working with multiple domain configurations, and even developing a bulk upload/download process to Google Drive.

I am working in China now, and the school does not have a campus wide VPN. Therefore our only affordable cloud solution is Office 365. Our current implementation has gained praise from the corporate giant itself, and soon I can share an article by Microsoft about what we have been doing and how we have been doing it.

However, the fact is Office 365 still has a very long way to go. If I had the option, I would still choose Google, and I would push hard for Chrome books for the younger students. Microsoft still is lacking in developing mature products that are truly online. They have new licensing, which is a huge step forward, but they are limiting the options to certain regions. This can be seen in the USA where students can easily get desktop software for free, but in China we have to make special arrangements to get these same features.

For those schools or districts who feel that you have some magic plan with Microsoft, believe me you do not. Anyone can access deals with enough users, and desktop software in 2015 should not be a motivating force for increasing student resources.

OneDrive for Business is better than it was last year, but still years behind Google Drive. It is very fast, and my tests have shown it to be faster than Dropbox or Google Drive. However, the desktop clients which are needed to do bulk work are rough around the edges. They do work, and on Mac OS X now as well, but if you are a Google Drive user you always feel like you are in someone’s beta test instead of a finished product.

The mobile Office 365 clients are pretty good. One shining example is OneNote. I really like OneNote, and I am starting to prefer it to Evernote. This is going to be a new key application we use with students in the next semester. It works great, and on iPad has some nice features for handwriting. What is funny is that OneNote is more flexible than Word and has features you would expect in a truly collaborative environment, yet, many decision makers are obsessed with giving everyone Word. I guess they love the useful WordArt and ClipArt.

The most powerful product in Office 365 for Education is Sharepoint. I find most schools barely or rarely use it. The fact is that it is more powerful than any Google Apps for Education resource. I would wager that you would need to buy many additional Google Apps features to match even 50% of the Sharepoint features. Unfortunately, non-developers and those who see the bare-bones implementation of Sharepoint, hate it.

People hate Sharepoint for a variety of reasons. Here are a few I often here:

  1. It looks bad and has an old design.
  2. The mobile compatibility is bad.
  3. The logic for linking things around is weird and does not seem to work well.
  4. The menus don’t make sense.
  5. The terminology of what a “thing” is does not make sense.
  6. It only works well in Windows.
  7. There seem to be features I cannot access.
  8. There is no public page for people who are not part of the organisation.
  9. Speed.
  10. It is seems like a pure business product.

Out of the box, all of these things are true, yet, they are also not true. Sharepoint is designed to be developed, not started and driven around like a golf cart. It is a set of tools that require a development environment and an implementation plan. Sharepoint is not something you use by random clicking, which is how many people seem to do things. It requires intent and purpose to be useful. From it’s core it is based-on your organisational needs, and not the needs of the outside world. The apps you can add to Sharepoint are not for entertainment. They are for getting work done and creating levels of accountability.

I have a love hate relationship with Sharepoint. When I finally deploy something, I find it works well and requires very little maintenance. While creating solutions in Sharepoint Developer, I find myself constantly frustrated at some of the features that a normal development kit would have sorted out properly.

People who end-up being Sharepoint power-users tend to like it. They learn to access and use data in different ways, and automate processes that are quiet difficult to manage on paper or even with sophisticated online forms.

If integrated properly into a normal content management system (Drupal, WordPress, etc.), Sharepoint solutions work well for normal end-users, and the security is handled without any additional work. But, it needs to be integrated, you do not want the average person to ever navigate Sharepoint.

Sharepoint has an up-sell for storage space which is annoying. OneDrive has a terabyte of space per user, but it is missing many features (unless you can find the secret menus). If Sharepoint had 100GB of space allotted per organisational user license, then it would actually be a better solution than OneDrive for most people, especially if the storage was flexible and assignable.

If you are using Office 365 for Education, and you are not using Sharepoint at all, then you are missing out on many powerful tools. To get started you need to setup a development environment and then do a few courses. Here are my recommendations for the development environment and what courses should be the initial focus:

Development Environment

  • iMac or large screen Apple Laptop with Virtualbox/VMware Fusion and a licensed 64 Bit version of Windows 7. A minimum 8 GB of RAM with 4 GB assigned to the virtual machine.
  • Office installed from the Office 365 online store. This allows all users to install Office on 5 devices.
  • IE 11 or higher in the Windows 7 Environment.
  • Notepad ++ for the Windows 7 Environment.
  • Turn off all Windows security, and firewalls.
  • Install Sharepoint Designer from the Office 365 online store.
  • Update Windows 7.
  • Backup the virtual machine to a secure area on the Mac or on an external drive. If Windows gets infected or too slow, trash the virtual machine and use the copy you have made.
  • MAMP for OS X to work on things like HTML,CSS, and Javascript. It is easier to experiment this way, before working in Sharepoint Designer or the online Sharepoint design interfaces.

Training Modules and Courses

  • Introduction to Sharepoint
  • Editing Pages
  • Sharepoint Lists and Columns
  • Web-parts and App-parts.
  • Security and Permissions with Groups
  • Introduction to Sharepoint Designer
  • Introduction to Infopath
  • Making Item Workflows in Sharepoint Designer
  • Importing data into Sharepoint
  • Using Excel spreadsheets in Sharepoint Lists
  • Understanding Calculated Columns

Tony DePrato

www.tonydeprato.com

Trash Microsoft Word? I don’t think so

10-reasons-oscar-2011-11-12-15-07.jpg

I’ve been reading Jeff Utecht’s blog for over a year now (if you don’t read it you should). Jeff is a wealth of information and I find nearly every post insightful, informative, or thought provoking but sometimes Jeff misses it. In September he wrote a post entitled 10 Reasons to Trash Word for Google Docs. I was curious and read on but at the end of the post I didn’t see eye to eye with Jeff. I just plain disagree with him on this point. Read on past the break to see why I think Jeff is wrong.

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