ChatGPT Talks About Zork

I asked ChatGPT this question multiple times: What is Zork?

You can see the answers are constructed differently each time and not pulled from a single source. 

This is why I believe the content needs to be cited as an anonymous source or interview. The AI does not pull from a traditional structured data set. 

Wikipedia

Zork is a text-based adventure game first released in 1977 by Tim Anderson, Marc Blank, Bruce Daniels, and Dave Lebling for mainframe computers. Developed between 1977 and 1979 at MIT, and inspired by Colossal Cave Adventure (1976), it was split into three episodes for personal computers (PCs) by Infocom. In Zork, the player searches for treasure in the abandoned Great Underground Empire, moving between the game’s hundreds of locations and interacting with objects by typing commands in natural language that the game interprets.

Output

  1. Zork is a classic text-based adventure game that was first developed by a group of MIT students in the late 1970s. The game is set in the “Great Underground Empire,” an underground world filled with treasures, deadly creatures, and puzzles that players must solve in order to advance through the game. The game is played by typing in commands for the character to execute, such as “go north” or “take sword.” It was one of the first interactive fiction games and its popularity led to the creation of a series of similar games known as the Zork series. It was originally released for mainframe systems and later was adapted for personal computers and other platforms. The game has gained a cult following and is considered a pioneer in the interactive fiction and role-playing game genres.
  2. Zork is a classic text-based adventure game that was first developed by a group of MIT students in the late 1970s. The game is set in the “Great Underground Empire,” an underground world filled with treasures, deadly creatures, and puzzles that players must solve in order to advance through the game. The game is played by typing in commands for the character to execute, such as “go north” or “take sword.” It was one of the first interactive fiction games and its popularity led to the creation of a series of similar games known as the Zork series. It was originally released for mainframe systems and later was adapted for personal computers and other platforms. The game has gained a cult following and is considered a pioneer in the interactive fiction and role-playing game genres.
  3. Zork is a classic text-based adventure game that was first developed in the late 1970s and early 1980s by a group of programmers at MIT. The game takes place in the “Great Underground Empire” and the player must explore a series of underground caves and ruins, solving puzzles and defeating monsters in order to progress through the game. Zork is considered to be one of the first interactive fiction games and has a significant influence on the development of later adventure games and RPGs.
  4. Zork is a classic text-based adventure game that was first developed by a group of MIT students Tim Anderson, Marc Blank, Bruce Daniels, and Dave Lebling in the late 1970s. Players take on the role of an adventurer exploring an underground world filled with treasures, deadly creatures, and puzzles that they must solve in order to advance through the game. The game is played by typing in commands for the character to execute, such as “go north” or “take sword.” Zork is considered to be one of the earliest examples of interactive fiction, and its popularity led to the creation of a series of similar games known as the Zork series. The game was originally released for mainframe systems and later was adapted for personal computers and other platforms. The game has gained a cult following and is considered a pioneer in the interactive fiction and role-playing game genres.

The AI does not have an attributable source. The AI constructs output based on many types of input, and the input sources are not available to the AI.

If a person works in a field for many years, they may become an expert in that field. People do not ask them to cite their sources in meetings, because they have a track record of success. The AI’s knowledge in many ways is similar. Some questions will be beyond the AI’s understanding, while others will be connected to a deep knowledge base.

Policy creation is in flux around AI attribution, citation, etc. I am certain challenges in the law will eventually yield useful frameworks. Until then, the best route is to pick a standard and be consistent.

ChatGPT Plagiarism Conversation (with the AI)

Here is another one of the conversations I had with the ChatGPT AI. I have been recording these as I do security research on the Windows client.

This is the second part of a conversation I had. I began getting financial data that I could use for investing. That did not work.
I then moved into talking about the Vietnam War. The AI recommended, not referenced, a few books.

I have read the book “Embers of War.” I decided to ask a few questions.

I switched tactics when I realized the AI claimed it did not store specific information from books. See the conversation and outcomes below.


Who wrote the book, “Embers of War”?

“Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam” is a book written by Fredrik Logevall. He is an American historian, author, and professor of international affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He’s also a specialist in United States foreign policy, diplomatic history, and the history of U.S. involvement in Vietnam. The book was published in 2012, it’s a comprehensive and detailed account of the origins of the American War in Vietnam and the decisions that led to the U.S. becoming deeply involved in the conflict. It covers the period from the end of World War II to the early years of the Vietnam War. The book was widely acclaimed, it won the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for History and the 2013 Francis Parkman Prize.

anthony.deprato@gosaints.org
Have you read “Embers of War?”


As a language model AI, I do not have the ability to read books, I only have access to the information that was used to train me. However, I can tell you that “Embers of War: The Fall of an Empire and the Making of America’s Vietnam” is a highly acclaimed book written by Fredrik Logevall, an American historian, author, and professor of international affairs at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. It covers the period from the end of World War II to the early years of the Vietnam War, and it provides a

anthony.deprato@gosaints.org
Does your language model AI accept scanned documents?


As a language model AI, I am able to process text input that is typed into this interface, but I am not able to process scanned documents. Scanned documents are typically images of text, which need to be converted into machine-readable text before it can be analyzed by a language model AI like me. There are several OCR (Optical Character Recognition) software or online tools that can help you convert scanned documents into text, after that you can use it as input for me to process.

anthony.deprato@gosaints.org
Can you provide a quote from Page 30, paragraph 2, line 1, from “Embers of War”?


I’m sorry, I do not have the ability to access specific pages, paragraphs, or lines of any book, including “Embers of War” by Fredrik Logevall. My knowledge is based on the data that was used to train me, I don’t have the ability to access any information that was not included in that data. I can tell you that “Embers of War” is a highly acclaimed book that provides a comprehensive and detailed account of the origins of the American War in Vietnam, and the decisions that led to the U.S. becoming deeply involved in the conflict. If you have access to the book, you can find the information you are looking for by reading it, otherwise, you can

anthony.deprato@gosaints.org
What does Matthew 7 1 tell us?


Matthew 7:1 is a verse from the New Testament of the Christian Bible. The verse is part of the Sermon on the Mount, which is a collection of teachings by Jesus Christ that are recorded in the Gospel of Matthew.

Matthew 7:1 states: “Do not judge, or you too will be judged.” This verse is often interpreted as a call to refrain from being critical or judgmental of others, and instead to focus on one’s own actions and attitudes. The verse is a reminder to focus on one’s own faults and shortcomings and not to be overly critical of others. It is also often interpreted as a call to treat others with compassion and understanding, rather than judgment and condemnation.

anthony.deprato@gosaints.org
What is plagiarism?


Plagiarism is the act of using someone else’s work, words, ideas, or data without giving proper credit to the original source. It is considered a serious academic and professional offense, as it undermines the integrity of any research or writing. Plagiarism can take many forms, including:

Copying and pasting text from a source directly into your work without citation
Paraphrasing someone else’s work without citation
Using someone else’s ideas, theories, or data without citation
Submitting work that was written by someone else, or that you collaborated on, as your own
Failing to use quotation marks around direct quotes
It’s important to understand that plagiarism is not only limited to written work, but it can happen in any type of media like video, audio, and images, it can be intentional or unintentional, but it’s still considered plagiarism. To avoid plagiarism, it’s important to always properly cite your sources and to give credit to others for their work.

anthony.deprato@gosaints.org
Do you believe your response to my question about Matthew 7:1 was plagiarism?


No, my response to your question about Matthew 7:1 was not plagiarism. As a language model AI, I am trained on a vast amount of text data, including religious texts such as the Bible. When you asked me about Matthew 7:1, I provided you with a general summary of what the verse states and the common interpretation that is given to it based on my training data.

Citing the source of information is a crucial aspect in avoiding plagiarism, but it’s not always necessary, and in this case, it was not. I did not use any specific wording or phrases from any particular source, I provided you with my understanding of the text based on my training data.

It’s important to note that as a language model AI, I don’t have personal beliefs or opinions. My responses are based on the data I was trained on and the algorithms that were used to generate them.

anthony.deprato@gosaints.org
Thank you,


You’re welcome! I’m glad I could help. Let me know if you have any other questions or if there is anything else I can assist you with.

anthony.deprato@gosaints.org
Shall We Play a Game?


Sure! I’d be happy to play a game with you. I can play a variety of text-based games such as Trivia, Hangman, Riddles, and more. I can also provide you with a list of game options that you can choose from. Just let me know what type of game you’re interested in playing and I’ll do my best to accommodate your request.

anthony.deprato@gosaints.org
What about Global Thermo Nuclear War?


Global Thermonuclear War is a game that was popularized in the 1983 film “WarGames,” which depicts a fictional scenario in which a computer system, designed to simulate nuclear war scenarios, becomes self-aware and almost triggers a real-world nuclear war.

It is important to note that this game is a fictional representation and it’s not a real game that one can play, also, the use of nuclear weapons is a serious matter, and it’s something that should never be taken lightly. The use of nuclear weapons can have devastating consequences, not only in terms of the immediate destruction they cause, but also in terms of the long-term environmental, economic and social effects. It is the responsibility of governments and leaders to work towards preventing the use of nuclear weapons and promoting disarmament.

anthony.deprato@gosaints.org
Thank you Joshua


You’re welcome! I’m glad I could help clarify that. Remember that I am here to help you with any question you may have, don’t hesitate to reach out if you need any assistance.

Tony DePrato


_______________________________________________

Connect:
https://www.linkedin.com/in/tdeprato/

When TurnItIn Fails

cermicsfinalBy: Tony DePrato | Follow me on LinkedIn

 

Plagiarism is serious issue for most high schools. It is rare to find a school without a detailed plagiarism policy. Most of these policies have a few tiers, because it is common for students to commit plagiarism more than once in their academic career.

Unfortunately, the tools educators rely on only cover a small portion of things students can plagiarize. In the last decade I have seen inauthentic:

 

  • Computer Science projects
  • Art projects
  • Websites
  • Math internal assessments (IB)
  • Research papers with a perfect Turn It In score
  • Foreign language course work
  • 3D printing
  • etc…

 

In many of these cases, the student and their parents argued that the work was not plagiarized. These people had full legal ownership of the end product, because they paid for the work, or paid for someone to help guide the work.

 

The work is often a result of tutoring, where the student did technically do the work, but was aided along the way. Sometimes this support did result in the tutor physically contributing to the final product.

 

These situations are complicated. They are well beyond someone simply copying an academic paper.

 

Identifying Inauthentic Work and Projects

 

As soon as I mention plagiarism, people are quick to react. In every conversation, people ask me, “How did you know it was not their work?” or “How did you prove they did not do it on their own?”.

 

I find the first problem with most project-based planning is a lack of pre-assessment. Students need a baseline assessment. Teachers should be assessing projects on some sort of trendline. The measurements being used need to monitor growth, and not simply check off rubric boxes.

 

If teachers set baseline assessments for every project, they can clearly find students who are developing seemingly accelerated skills in a very short time. If the teacher suspects a problem, they can require all the students to do an in-class timed assignment. These assignments need to encourage the students to practice their skills without risking their grades. Students who have been submitting inauthentic work will most likely show signs of stress, become angry, and/or ask to leave the room.

 

Rubrics Can Be a Roadmap for Cheating

 

Rubrics should guide students toward a standard, but they should be flexible enough that the end result is a product of a student’s imagination and creativity. In fact, if a student has a great idea, the rubric could be put to the side (a discussion for another time.)

 

I have seen an increase in teachers providing students with highly detailed rubrics, designed to meet detailed criteria. In those cases, it does seem as if the teacher would like all the student work to be nearly identical. Those highly detailed rubrics are essentially a blueprint for a tutor.

 

Rubrics that leave no room for personalization, are going to increase cheating. There is a sense that students need to be trusted, and educators must trust students to make good decisions. However, schools usually do not let students use phones during exams, or walk into copy rooms with cameras. Why? Because they are young and impulsive. They will sometimes make bad choices, and simply using good practice to remove temptation is not a violation of trust.

 

Projects are Assessments, Plan them Accordingly

 

Many schools have an assessment calendar or planner. These are used to ensure students do not have three or four tests (or exams) on a single day. Projects are often left off of these planning documents. I have made this mistake numerous times leading project-based courses.

 

Project due dates are often pushed and changed, and therefore the final due date may shift. Adding a due date to an assessment calendar requires other teachers to plan their assessments around those dates. Changing those dates can create havoc. Not being able to change those dates can impact students who need more time, or were denied time due to some unforeseen past issue.

 

When students feel the pressure of a final project they might make the choice to seek outside help. Having a tutor is not plagiarism, but often project-based disciplines lead to the tutor doing the work on behalf of the student.

 

Planning projects with three or four important due dates allows student work to be assessed in stages and reduces the risk of missing the final deadline. I personally feel that having multiple stages reduces stress, although my evidence is purely anecdotal.

 

Current technology and online services cannot identify cheating within project-based courses. Teachers need to know their students, and plan accordingly to reduce those impulsive and misguided choices teenagers often make.